Adie Basel!

Very recently, we marked the end of an era: the four of us have recently all upped sticks and left our lovely little town in Switzerland and moved en masse to London. It turns out moving is hard work, and we’ve been busy little bees getting all settled in.

Before we left Basel for the big city, though, we thought we’d go out with a bang and mark our departure by splashing out on one of our favourite local dishes: Zürcher Geschnetzeltes with Rösti. We were feeling a bit fancy that day, so we also made some traditional Käsekuchen, and had ourselves a proper Goodbye Switzerland feast.

Zürcher Geschnetzeltes is made with veal, which sort of ruptured our bank accounts, and almost an insane amount of white wine. You could use a meat other than veal, but it wouldn’t be as yummy. The recipe we used was a slight modification of one we found via Coop. Pre-warning: we used ready-made Rösti. If you really want to go for it and make your own Rösti (essentially fancy potato hash), find a recipe alllllll the way at the bottom of the page of this Guardian article. (Pro-tip: add bacon bits for extra yum.)

Zürcher Geschnetzeltes with Rösti

Geschnetzeltes

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Four’s Lazy Peach Tarts

Making puff pastry by hand is for losers. No one has that kind of time any more.

Don’t judge these tarts because they’re easy – love them because they’re tasty.

These tarts come in handy if you’re ever in a pinch for a delicious treat that is fast, easy and cheap. Number Four shamelessly stole this recipe from a friend and has altered it to make it even more delicious (… and easy).

Number Four’s Lazy Peach Tarts

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The Importance of Eating Waffles

The Waffle (/Wå:ffledh/) was discovered in 1824 by the Belgian Pierre le Waffe when he accidentally dropped waffle batter onto a waffle iron. They instantly became a hit, causing the Second Great Flour Rush of the 19th Century.

Few people know that Margaret Thatcher’s full nickname is, in fact, The Waffle Iron Lady, title which she earned when she was crowned winner of Parliament’s Annual Waffle Eating Competition in 1957, beating both Winston Churchill and William Pitt the Elder by an astounding 27 waffles.

Waffles have been known to cure any ailment, ranging from the common cold to chicken pox. Research shows that people who eat an average of 2.4 waffles a week are happier, more successful and have more fulfilling sex lives.

Faced with the overwhelming evidence of the benefits of regular waffle consumption, we had no choice but to eat a shedload of them so as to increase our average health and general quality of life.

Better Homes and Gardens’ Waffles

WaffleEdit

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